HomeLatest NewsHarvard Applications Nosedive 17% Amid Controversy

Harvard Applications Nosedive 17% Amid Controversy

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Most stores with fragile merchandise display the sign “You Break It, You Buy It”. I love the old saying “You reap what you sow,” which means that you will eventually have to deal with the consequences of your actions.

Your sales plummet when you tie your beer brand to a transgender celebrity. This is not a joke — it’s exactly what happened to Bud Light.

Like Bud Light, Harvard University has learned the hard way that actions and inactions have consequences. Early admissions applications dropped by 17 percent this fall in response to the antisemitism scandal that engulfed the Ivy League campus.

The numbers aren’t that high — 7,921 seniors from high schools applied for early admission in 2018, compared with 9,553 students in 2022. But it’s worth noting that the deadline to apply was November 1. It was just after Hamas’ terror attacks against Israel on October 7, but before Claudine Gay embarrassed herself in front of Congress by refusing a strong condemnation of the antisemitism on her campus.

She has also somehow managed to survive a plagiarism scandal, which would have seen most university heads thrown out. Harvard, however, seems to be determined to destroy its august reputation as soon as possible. They seem to have forgotten about their reputation, and would rather pray at the altar of the woke gods than offer a stimulating, sober education.

Since October 7, Harvard has seen numerous instances of antisemitism, and the support of Hamas terror. After the attacks, in which at least 1,200 Israelis were killed, a Palestinian affinity group released a statement that blamed Israel for the massacre.

Bob Sweeney, a retired college counselor, said that antisemitism in Harvard could have contributed to a decline in the number of applications. “That could be one of many reasons, for safety concerns on campus.”

Harvard won’t pay a high price for their extensive exposure. There will be plenty of applicants, and they still have a $53 billion estimated endowment, despite some major donors leaving. Harvard won’t die, but they may need to change some things.

As we saw in the case of Bud Light, people vote with their wallets or their feet. I know several parents who once dreamed that their children would be accepted into Ivy League colleges, but now are leery about spending $80,000 to $100,000 a year to brainwash their offspring.

It is not surprising that early applications for admissions have dropped by 17 percent. This may be a sign that people are realizing that universities have become progressive cults, rather than educational institutions.

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