HomeLatest NewsCalifornia Launches Snitch Hotline for Reporting Discrimination

California Launches Snitch Hotline for Reporting Discrimination

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Californians can now report “hate crimes” by calling an anonymous hotline.

On Friday, Gov. Gavin Newsom launched CA vs Hate, a program by the California Civil Rights Department and the Democratic Governor. Californians are able to use the hotline in order to report neighbors who commit “hate crimes”, which according to the service do not always involve violent acts.

According to the website, a hate crime is an act or expression motivated by prejudice towards another’s perceived identity or identity. This includes biases against race, color, disability, and religious beliefs. It also includes biases regarding national origin, sexual orientation, gender, and gender. ”

According to the website, “hate incidents”, include “refusing service”, “derogatory name calling”, and “bullying”.

Newsom stated that the hotline was “an unambiguous signal” that hate will not be tolerated by California.

In a release to the press, he said that “We’re committed to a California For All.” We must hold the perpetrators accountable for their actions, and provide resources to victims of hate crime. Californians have a new tool to help ensure that not only justice is served, but that victims also have access to resources that can assist them in dealing with the lingering consequences of such a horrific crime.

The hotline does not share reports with law enforcement unless the person making the report requests it. But, the hotline can share information with law enforcement “if necessary”.

“The hotline service will identify civil legal options that do not involve criminal justice, both through Civil Rights Department or other agencies.”

It’s interesting to note that California’s penal code defines “hate crimes”, which is more strict than the definition offered by the hotline.

To be found guilty in California of a hate crime, the prosecutor has to prove that the accused acted intentionally, used force, and interfered with the constitutional rights of the victim. In California, the prosecutor must prove that the accused acted intentionally, used force, and interfered with a person’s constitutional rights.

Name-calling and other so-called hate crimes are not included in the list.

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